Connecticut Fishing Licenses, Laws, and Regulations – Licencia de pesca

\"Connecticut

Connecticut Fishing Licenses, Laws, and Regulations

With over one hundred and eighty lakes and waterways, Connecticut\’s waters are teeming with trout-sized trout and perch. Trout Park is a popular destination for tourists and fishing enthusiasts who hope to see these beauties firsthand.

There are a number of fishing licenses to choose from, so it is important to confirm your location first before purchasing one. The links in this section will give you all the information you need to complete this task. You can buy one online or through authorized retailers such as a tackle shop or your local sports stores.

Before you travel, find out about Connecticut fishing rules and regulations. Also, you need to watch out for regular updates as some laws change from time to time depending on the climate, month, or current fish stocks in the area.

Connecticut Fishing Licenses

Collecting trophy-sized catches is every angler\’s dream. However, Connecticut advocates the practice of trapping and releasing to protect and preserve marine life in the area. The best thing to do is to familiarize yourself with local regulations regarding the size and length of fish you can bag for a stress-free vacation.

Connecticut is one of the most underrated places to go fishing. The state has over 180 public lakes and ponds, including thousands of rivers and streams. Many of these fishing spots are interspersed with game fish and panfish such as trout, perch, pikeperch, blue gills and pike.

Connecticut is best known for its Farmington and Housatonic Rivers, which are the favorite spots for local fishermen to get the best catch, especially when they catch the coveted fish. The state\’s hatcheries ensure that Connecticut\’s ponds and creeks are replenished with fresh trout weekly.

If this is your first time to explore the rich waters of Connecticut, the first thing you must do is get a fishing license. We\’ve created a complete guide to getting a Connecticut fishing license, including the rules and regulations you MUST follow.

How do I get a Connecticut fishing license?

For those of you who want to fish, the Inland District requires an inland fishing license for anyone over the age of 16. For marine fishing licenses, individuals must have these licenses if they are over 26 years of age. These special marine licenses are required when fishing from the shore or by boat in the marine area, or when landing special marine fish or bait in Connecticut that is taken from the coastal waters. The fishing licenses themselves are issued every calendar year and expire on December 31st. To get a fishing license, you can go to the following locations:

Connecticut License types and costs

License type fee

(As of 1.1.15)

Residents Freshwater fishing  

$ 28.00

$ 14.00

Residents Fishing in all waters  

$ 32.00

$ 16.00

Residents Inland fishing and small game hunting  

$ 38.00

$ 19.00

Residents Fishing and small game hunting in all waters  

$ 40.00

$ 20.00

Residents Fishing in all waters and permits for bows and arrows to hunt deer and small game  

 

$ 65.00

$ 33.00

Trout and salmon stampsNew for 2021

Frequently asked questions about trout and salmon stamping

Age 18-64

Age 65 and older

Age 16 and 17

 

$ 5.00

$ 5.00

$ 3.00

Residents Senior (65 and older) – Inland fishing For free (Requires annual renewal)
Not resident Seasonal freshwater fishing $ 55.00
Not resident Fishing in all waters in season $ 63.00
Not resident Three day inland fishing $ 22.00
Not resident Inland fishing and small game hunting $ 110.00
Not resident All waters fishing and gun hunting $ 120.00
Members of the armed forces * Freshwater fishing $ 28.00
Members of the armed forces * Fishing and small game hunting in all waters $ 40.00
Members of the armed forces * Inland fishing and small game hunting $ 38.00
Mentally Handicapped or Blind ** – Inland Fishing For free
Physically handicapped people *** – Inland fishing For free
Physically handicapped people *** – Inland fishing and small game hunting For free

Source: Ct.gov – Connecticut State Department of Energy & Environment Protection

Sea fishing licenses

License type fee
Residents Fishing in marine waters  

$ 10.00

$ 5.00

Residents One day fishing in the sea  

$ 5.00

$ 3.00

Residents Fishing in all waters  

$ 32.00

$ 16.00

Residents Senior (65 or older) – Fishing in marine waters For free (Requires annual renewal)
Residents Sea fishing and gun hunting  

 

$ 25.00

$ 13.00

Residents All waters fishing and gun hunting  

 

$ 40.00

$ 20.00

Not resident Fishing in marine waters $ 15.00
Not resident Fishing in all waters in season $ 63.00
Not resident Sea fishing and gun hunting $ 94.00
Not resident All waters fishing and gun hunting $ 120.00
Not resident Three days of fishing in the sea $ 8.00
Members of the armed forces * Fishing in marine waters $ 10.00
Mentally Handicapped or Blind ** – Sea Fishing For free
Physically handicapped people *** – Sea fishing For free

Source: Ct.gov – Connecticut State Department of Energy & Environment Protection

Who Needs a Connecticut Fishing License?

As mentioned above, everyone over the age of 16 must have a fishing license. The type of fishing license you need primarily depends on many factors, such as: B. Your age, your place of residence, your location and the type of fish you plan to fish.

How do I renew my Connecticut license?

To renew your fishing license, simply go to the available spots to get a new fishing license. The fee for a sea permit is $ 10 for residents ages 16 to 64. The license is free for seniors over 65 years of age. For non-residents 16 and over, the fee is $ 15. Anglers must be licensed to fish in Connecticut waters.

Connecticut fish size and limits

As an angler, it is important to know the specific fishing regulations of the state in which you are fishing. These fishing laws aim to conserve and improve fish stocks and protect the species\’ ecosystem. Therefore, fishery biologists examine large bodies of water to check the number and health of different fish species.

There are several types of fishing regulations in the state of Connecticut, including size and catch restrictions. Check out the full guide below:

 

species Remarks Minimum length Daily

Creel limit

(Fish per angler)

Open session
Alewoman /

Blueback herring

The consumption of Alewife and Blueback Herring is prohibited.
American eel Eel pots limited to 2 pots per person, for personal use only.

Legal Methods: Fishing, Snagging, Spearing, Eel Pot

The harvest of the silver eel is forbidden.

9 ″ 25th All the year long
American shad All state waters with the exception of the Connecticut River closed. None 6th All the year long
Atlantic cod visit this link for updated federal regulations. 23 ″ 10 All the year long
Black sea bass Length without tendril (tail filament).
See this link for party / charter fishing regulations.
fifteen\» 5 May 19 – December 31
Blue fish None 10 All the year long
Haddock visit this link for updated federal regulations. 18 ″ None All the year long
Hickory shad None 6th All the year long
Menhaden None 50 fish or 5 gallons All the year long
coalfish visit this link for updated federal regulations. 19 ″ None All the year long
Red drum No one is allowed to own a red drum larger than 27 inches, measured from the tip of the snout to the end of the tail. Any red drum larger than 27 ″ must be returned immediately to the water from which it was taken without avoidable injury. None None None
Forelock (porgy) See www.ct.gov/deep/saltwaterfishing for party / charter fishing regulations. 9 ″ 30th All the year long
In fishing spots with improved fishing opportunities (see Appendix A. on Improved fishing opportunities) 8th\» 30th
Sea trout

(Brown, brook, rainbow)

fifteen\» 2 All the year long
Striped bass No spearing or gaffing 28 ″ 1 All the year long
Summer Flounder (Fluke) On the water, the fillets must meet the minimum length or be accompanied by a rack of legal size (carcass). See www.ct.gov/deep/saltwater Fishing for updated regulations 19 ″ 4th May 4th – September 30th
In fishing spots with improved fishing opportunities (see Appendix A. on Improved fishing opportunities) 17 ″ 4th May 4th – September 30th
Tautog (black fish) 16 ″ 2 April 1st – April 30th

and July 1st – August 31st

16 ″ 3 October 10th – November 28th
Weak fish 16 ″ 1 All the year long
White perch 7 ″ 30th All the year long
Winter flounder 12 ″ 2 April 1st – December 31st
Sharks / tuna * A Highly Migratory Species Permit (HMS) is required to catch, own, or land shark species other than smooth or spiny dogfish. To obtain an HMS permit, see this link or call NMFS Customer Service at 888-872-8862

Source: Connecticut Angler\’s Guide Inland & Marine Fishing

What Are Connecticut\’s Best Fishing Spots?

Crescent Lake in Southington is a beautiful hilltop lake filled with freshwater trout and catfish. Another great spot in the fishing community is the Farmington Rivers in Windsor, known for making bait work well in these waters. Other notable places anglers love include the Cockaponset State Forest in Haddam, Fort Trumbull State Park in New London, the Quinnipiac River in South Meriden, the Connecticut River from Middletown to Hartford, Lake McDonough in Barkhamsted, Squantz Pond State Park in New Fairfield, Satan\’s Kingdom in New Hartford, and Stratton Brook State Park in Simsbury.

Deja un comentario

Tu dirección de correo electrónico no será publicada. Los campos obligatorios están marcados con *

Ir arriba